Peeping Tom (1960) dir. Michael Powell

A young serial killer murders women, capturing their last expressions on his film camera. An intelligent psychological thriller from British director Michael Powell, written by Leo Marks. Themes of voyeurism, sympathy, repression, Freudian relationships and child exploitation. Remarkable allegory of filmmaker in general and involvement of the audience.
Often compared to Alfred Hitchcock‘s Psycho (not only due to the same year of release), however, Tom is a much different look at the serial killer motif. Perhaps inappropriately categorized as a horror film, this is a movie which relies not on the ‘jump scare’, but on it’s thought-provoking narrative, masterful direction and noteworthy editing.
Superb musical score, composed by Brian Easdale and played by Australian piano virtuoso Gordon Watson.
Due to some of it’s themes, the film was at first harshly received by critics, later to be re-evaluated and cited as a masterpiece.
Martin Scorsese has said of this film, “I have always felt that Peeping Tom and [Fellini’s] 8½ say everything that can be said about filmmaking, about the process of dealing with film, the objectivity and subjectivity of it and the confusion between the two. Peeping Tom shows the aggression of it, how the camera violates.
Must-See!

Peeping Tom Cast: Carl Boehm, Moira Shearer, Anna Massey, Maxine Audley, Pamela Green

IMDb: http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0054167/

Peeping Tom

Peeping Tom

Peeping Tom

Peeping Tom