La Haine (1995) dir. Mathieu Kassovitz

La Haine (Hate) recalls a day in the life of the “troubled ethnic youth” of a Parisian suburbs ghetto, after a night of protests, riots and heavy police presence. A masterpiece of new French cinema. Raw, powerful, gritty and thought-provoking.
Delves into the difficult theme of racism in the Western world, in this case – today’s effects of French colonialism and the assimilation of ethnic minorities – a theme that is current to this day, as well as a stark depiction of police brutality and societal class structure.
A multi-layered film which is open to many different interpretations. Gives the viewer an illumination of the darkest corners in modern Western society, the “ghetto” projects of the large city.
Characteristic black and white cinematography. Powerful scenes and innovative camera movement.
Superb performances from a young Vincent Cassel (in only his second feature film!), Hubert Koundé and Saïd Taghmaoui.
Kassovitz won the Best Director Award, after receiving a standing ovation at the 1995 Cannes Film Festival. After the film’s warm reception, then Prime Minister of France Alain Juppé required that all cabinet ministers view La Haine in a special screening he had organized of the film.

La Haine Cast: Vincent Cassel, Hubert Koundé, Saïd Taghmaoui

IMDb: http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0113247

La Haine

“La haine attire la haine !” (Hatred breeds hatred)

La Haine

La Haine

La Haine

Vinz, Sayid and Hubert